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Archive for the ‘ISMS’ Category

More InfoSec Glossary: Freely Available ISO 27000 PDF

Posted by Jaime Raphael Licauco, CISSP, GSEC on November 2, 2009

The ISO 27000 (Information security management systems — Overview and vocabulary) document is part of ISO’s Publicly Available Standards. Because of this, you may download it, store it on your PC, and print out one copy of the file, but aren’t allowed to transfer or place it on a network without the authorization of the copyright owner. You can read the whole License Agreement, and download the ISO 27000 document here.


Another place to check out for InfoSec definitions is at the Software and Systems Engineering Vocabulary (SE VOCAB) Site. This is a project of the IEEE Computer Society, and ISO/IEC JTC 1/SC7.


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Posted in Free, Glossary, ISMS | Tagged: , , , | 5 Comments »

Opinion: Philippine Cybercrime Bill, wherefore art thou?

Posted by Jaime Raphael Licauco, CISSP, GSEC on March 12, 2009

For around two years now, Information Security Professionals have been saying that cybercrime is on the rise because of the change from ego-centric (i.e. malware that begs for attention) to financial motivation (i.e. malware that accumulates/sends data, silently evading detection). This financial motivation has led to cyber markets/exchanges wherein hackers and their cohorts transact, and in a more recent development, now specialize on a certain aspect of their trade, which in turn has increased efficiency. For example, some specialize on retrieving credit card numbers and other personal information, others specialize on printing the fake cards, while others use the cards, whether they be an ATM (Citibank hack in NYC) or a credit card (Malaysian’s arrested in Australia for fake credit card use). The current worldwide economic environment has only made matters worse.

The question here is, where is the Philippine version of the Cybercrime bill? Around two months ago, it was still on its second reading in Congress. It’s already taken more than eight years, I could be wrong, but I doubt its finally passed.

From what I’ve seen and experienced, I find it hard to believe that barely any cybercrime happens here. There are far too many good Filipino hackers and scammers, for nothing to be happening. Maybe audit logs aren’t turned on, maybe no one regularly checks the logs, maybe when people get scammed, they just let it go (feel free to blame the culture). UK’s BERR and PWC InfoSec Breaches Survey of 2008 states that there are fewer incidents reported in 2008 than 2004, however it may be because they’ve been understated since they found out that “companies that carry out risk assessment are four times as likely to detect identity theft as those that do not.” Which begs the question, do Philippine organizations with confidential information actually undertake risk assessments and take appropriate actions and implement controls to protect their assets? Just because an organization doesn’t have “incidents” doesn’t mean that confidential information doesn’t leak. How does one report an information security incident when one isn’t aware on how to identify it? Secondly, would the company in question have a process in place to accommodate what an employee finds suspicious? Third, would that company then have a process and resources (i.e. competence in IT Forensics) to investigate the report? I’m sure that if it happens to more security conscious countries, it must be happening here, we just aren’t aware of it or it isn’t reported… especially with all the useless WEP encryption found in coffee shops, keyloggers found in internet cafes, surreptitious card reader machines used to read credit card information, to stories of scammers at Philippine online auction sites.

Maybe it will take a high profile hacking on one of our few promising industries that is heavily dependent on IT: one of our BPOs. Or maybe even the hacking of private files of one of our lawmakers (Obama, Palin, and McCain got hacked last year) for there to be any progress on this bill. Whether that happens or not, I find it indefensible to wait for something bad to happen to impel lawmakers to do what’s right, and give the country and its people what there’s obviously a need for.

References:
(InfoSec Philippines) Nov 11, 2008 (note: has links to Philippine Cybercime bill news articles)
(TechRepublic, Sep 2007) Cybercrime tools market maturing, and crimes are on the rise
(Newsweek, Dec 2008) The Rise of Black Market Data
(Univ of Mannheim, Germany, Dec 2008) Learning More About the Underground Economy: A Case-Study of Keyloggers and Dropzones
(Wired, Oct 2008) Cybercrime Supersite ‘DarkMarket’ Was FBI Sting, Documents Confirm
(Symantec, Nov 2008) New Symantec Report Reveals Booming Underground Economy
(ihotdesk Outsourcing News, Dec 2007) Cyber crime market threatens data
(ContactCenterWorld.com, Feb 2009) Japanese Cybercrime at Record Levels as Hackers Crack Web sites
(Computer Crime Research Center, Oct 2008) Recent Stock Market Decline Causes Economic Cybercrime to Hit All Time High
(CBCNews Canada, Mar 2009) Fraud artists, security experts fight sophisticated battle
(ArticSoft, 2004) How Do You Deal With Internet Fraud
(Credit Cards Web UK, Mar 2009) Card fraud refunds being refused by more banks

Posted in Awareness, Compliance, ISMS, Legal, Opinion, Philippines | Tagged: , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

CAG and Metricon 3 Slides

Posted by Jaime Raphael Licauco, CISSP, GSEC on March 6, 2009

A few days ago, SANS and and a US consortium of FED agencies released the Consensus Audit Guidelines Draft 1.0. It is described as the “Twenty Most Important Controls and Metrics for Effective Cyber Defense and Continuous FISMA Compliance”.

Some of these controls may be included in ISO 27001 implementations to complement controls found in 27002 since 27001 has been criticized for not having enough controls regarding Web App Security and Wireless Security. Take note that these controls are specific and technology based.

The controls are as follows:
Critical Control 1: Inventory of authorized and unauthorized hardware.
Critical Control 2: Inventory of authorized and unauthorized software; enforcement of white lists of authorized software.
Critical Control 3: Secure configurations for hardware and software on laptops, workstations, and servers.
Critical Control 4: Secure configurations of network devices such as firewalls, routers, and switches.
Critical Control 5: Boundary Defense
Critical Control 6: Maintenance, Monitoring and Analysis of Complete Audit Logs
Critical Control 7: Application Software Security
Critical Control 8: Controlled Use of Administrative Privileges
Critical Control 9: Controlled Access Based On Need to Know
Critical Control 10: Continuous Vulnerability Testing and Remediation
Critical Control 11: Dormant Account Monitoring and Control
Critical Control 12: Anti-Malware Defenses
Critical Control 13: Limitation and Control of Ports, Protocols and Services
Critical Control 14: Wireless Device Control
Critical Control 15: Data Leakage Protection
Critical Control 16: Secure Network Engineering
Critical Control 17: Red Team Exercises
Critical Control 18: Incident Response Capability
Critical Control 19: Data Recovery Capability
Critical Control 20: Security Skills Assessment and Appropriate Training To Fill Gaps

A related article in GCN states that CAG is not a substitute for FISMA guidance. The NIST will also be finishing the 3rd revision of their SP800-53 (Recommended Security Controls for Fed Info Systems and Orgs) revision soon and comments will be closed by March 27. The current drafts can be found here.


Metricon 3 Slides
Metricon 3 slides have been out for since July 2008, but since I haven’t posted them here, I’m including a link here.

My favorites are:
Sandy Hawke’s Bringing Metrics into the Enterprise, Kevin Peuhkurinen’s Balanced Scorecard Approach to InfoSec Metrics, Caroline Wong’s Global Information Security Metrics, and Yolanta Beres’ Security Analytics Driving Better Metrics.


Site News
Since you’ve probably noticed, I’ve added Search to the site and changed the Theme. I’ve also updated links in ISMS and Security Metrics.

Posted in ISMS, Metrics | Tagged: , , , | 2 Comments »

Info Sec News, Feb 5, 2009

Posted by Jaime Raphael Licauco, CISSP, GSEC on February 5, 2009

Seminars
ECCInternational will be giving a Certified BCMS (ISO 25999:2007) course from Feb 9-11. They will also be giving an ITIL Practitioner Program – Configuration Management on Feb 10-11, you can check out their Training Schedule here. ISO 9001:2008 IRCA Certified Lead Auditor Seminar will also be given either on Feb 9-13 or Feb 16-20. For details and specific dates, please contact Rose, Faith or Ness at 7505671 to 73 or email training@ccinternational.com.


Webcasts
CSO Online has published a podcast interview of Jim Routh who is the CISO of the Depository Trust and Clearing Corporation (DTCC). He is a veteran technology and security executive, having held positions at American Express and American Express Financial Advisors before joining DTCC.

(Simply Continuous) How To Keep Your Business Running in the Event of a Disaster


Whitepapers
There’s a recent (Winter 2009) presentation published by the Standford Applied Crypto group by John Mitchell on Phishing and Malicious JavaScript. Aside from Phishing, the presentation talks about how JavaScript is used to obtain information from your browser. John Mitchell teaches CS 142, Web Programming and Security, at Stanford University.

(SonicWall) Bottom-line benefits of telecommuting & secure remote access
(Quest Software) Finding Complete Identity Lifecycle Management that Fits


Insider Threat
I either gotta love this… or get paranoid about this: Within 90 minutes of getting fired, a former contract worker for Fannie Mae allegedly added a malicious script hidden within a legitimate script that ran each morning on the network, which was designed to disable monitoring alerts and all log-ins, delete the root passwords to the 4,000 Fannie Mae servers, erase all data and backup data, power off all the servers and then disable the ability to remotely switch on the machines. This was fortunately found by another employee within days of the firing.

(Computerworld) Ex-Fannie Mae engineer pleads innocent to server bomb charge
(CSO Online) Alleged Fannie Mae data bomb author working for Bank of America now?

Another recent example of an Insider Threat is of a former employee that still has access to the system, as this article reports, “Mysterious Text-Message Alert at U. of Florida Scares and Angers Students.


Psychology/Social Engineering
There’s good insight as to the psychology involved when it comes to Information Security in this article from (CSO Online) Are You Addicted to Information Insecurity?

And speaking of psychology, CSO Online’s Anatomy of a Hack is an in-depth article on how Social Engineering can be used. Also in connection to social engineering, the FBI also warns of Money Mule Scams.

A novel way of luring people to a website with malware was found in North Dakota. How? Stick a parking violation ticket on the windshield, with the supposed details of the infraction on a website.

Readers of this blog might also want to check out What the Web knows about you. Its a 6 page article on what attackers may be able to find out about you online. If you’re in the US and is considering searching your SS number, check out this article first on Search Engine Privacy Tips from the World Privacy Forum website.


Browser Security
CSO Online also did a an unscientific poll of security experts on browser security, and it turns out that IE isn’t viewed as being as insecure as it was just a few years back. In relation to browser security, Firefox just fixed a couple of vulnerabilities in their release of version 3.06 of their browser.

Also related, Browser secrets of secure connections talks about how browsers play a key part in determining the strength of cipher used between the client and the web server. The article references the Infoworld Test Center Guide to browser security.


New DNS Attack
(CSO Online) Porn Site Feud Spawns New DNS Attack – Botnet operators are adding code to launch a new type of distributed denial of service attack, security experts warn
(NetworkWorld.com) Porn Site Feud Spawns New DNS Attack – A scrap between two pornographic Web sites turned nasty when one figured out how to take down the other by exploiting a previously unknown quirk in the Internet’s DNS.
(NetworkWorld.com Slideshow) How DNS cache poisoning works – this also has tips at the end on how to defend this kind of attack.


Other Info Sec News
(CSO Online) SMB Security: Five Bright Ideas – Small businesses have to be crafty to handle security with fewer resources. Here are bright ideas for SMBs.

(Computerworld Blog) Security businesses move ahead in this economy

(Computerworld) Removing admin rights stymies 92% of Microsoft’s bugs

(Computerworld) Microsoft denies Windows 7 security feature contains bug

(Computerworld) Banks, customers feel the fallout of the Heartland breach

(Computerworld) Study: Data breaches continue to get more costly for businesses

(Computerworld) Obama health care plan said to boost security, privacy controls – Privacy advocates say $20B e-health proposal overcomes some HIPAA concerns

Posted in Change Management, conferences, Incident Management, ISMS, Presentations, Privacy, social engineering, Webinars, Whitepapers | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Curse of Silence Update 2

Posted by Jaime Raphael Licauco, CISSP, GSEC on January 29, 2009

If you have a Nokia S60 3rd Edition phone, which doesn’t seem to be accepting messages, or just accepts some but not all messages, your phone may have been attacked by what’s been called as the “Curse of Silence“. Nokia Europe has just released their SMS Cleaner which can clean Nokia S60 3rd Edition (Initial or Feature Pack 1) based devices. Nokia doesn’t say if it will erase anything from the affected phone aside from the “Curse of Silence” messages.

S60 3rd Edition, Feature Pack 1 (S60 3.1):
Nokia E90 Communicator
Nokia E71
Nokia E66
Nokia E51
Nokia N95 8GB
Nokia N95
Nokia N82
Nokia N81 8GB
Nokia N81
Nokia N76
Nokia 6290
Nokia 6124 classic
Nokia 6121 classic
Nokia 6120 classic
Nokia 6110 Navigator
Nokia 5700 XpressMusic

S60 3rd Edition, initial release (S60 3.0):

Nokia E70
Nokia E65
Nokia E62
Nokia E61i
Nokia E61
Nokia E60
Nokia E50
Nokia N93i
Nokia N93
Nokia N92
Nokia N91 8GB
Nokia N91
Nokia N80
Nokia N77
Nokia N73
Nokia N71
Nokia 5500
Nokia 3250

No word yet on software that can undo the problem for devices with S60 2nd edition with Feature Pack 2 and 3.

You can also check out this site to find out if your handset is running S60 and what Feature Pack it has.



A few days after this post, Nokia released SMS Cleaner for Feature Pack 2 and 3.

Posted in DOS, ISMS, malware | Tagged: , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Info Sec News, Jan 19, 2009

Posted by Jaime Raphael Licauco, CISSP, GSEC on January 19, 2009

Secure Coding and Application Dev
What is probably the most significant security news item of the past week is the release of SANS and Mitre of their Top 25 errors and how to fix them. It’s been said that around 85% of criminal activities on the net stem from the current crop of Top 25 flaws. The Top 25 list is divided into three broad categories namely: Insecure Interaction Between Components, Risky Resource Management, and Porous Defenses.

The PDF version of the Top 25 is available here.

The Software Assurance Forum for Excellence in Code (SAFECode) has made two publications available to help eliminate the Top 25 errors, its Guide to the Most Effective Secure Dev Practices in Use Today, and Software Assurance: An Overview of Current Industry Best Practices.


Social Engineering
A rehash of old tactics can be seen in an E-mail purportedly from Northwest Airlines (but actually carries a zipped trojan file), and malware spreading websites that claim US President elect Obama won’t be taking the oath of office on the 20th. This just strengthens the argument that your personnel and their security awareness training are now your first line of defense, and not your perimeter firewall.

This is related to the fake Christmas and holiday greetings that been sent every year for the past few years, which was seen again this past Christmas.


Malware
The Downadup (also known as Conficker) Worm versions A, B and C that exploits what Microsoft released an out of band patch for in late October ’08, and weak Admin passwords, is said to have infected an “amazing” 9 million PC’s according to F-Secure researchers. If you’re wondering how they got to this astonishing figure, check out F-Secure’s Blog.

(PC World) UK Ministry of Defence Stung by Rapidly Spreading Virus


Secure deletion, reuse or disposal
According to new research led by Craig Wright, it just takes one re-write to securely wipe the data from a hard drive. This talks about a complete sector by sector overwrite of a hard drive.

Articles on this can be found on Heise Security and SecurityFocus. The paper was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Information Systems Security (ICISS) in Hyderabad, India and can be purchased here.


Encryption
Heise Security has published an in depth article on how modern cryptological attacks are done in their article, “Cheap Cracks“.


Patches and Change Management
Oracle released fixes for 41 different flaws this month and Microsoft released a single patch that closed three flaws.

(Heise Security) Numerous security updates from Oracle
(Heise Security) Microsoft closes three holes in Windows
Microsoft issues patches for ‘nasty’ Windows bugs

A vulnerability in SAP GUI has also been found and a patch has been released and is available to registered SAP users.


Other InfoSec News:
In relation to the Anonymization article I wrote about a few days ago, the makers of Tor has announced that their software has zero known bugs.

(Computerworld) Two big, bad botnets gone, but replacements step up

(Computerworld) Critical security projects escape the budget ax

(Heise Security) Banking details can be stolen through a new JavaScript exploit

(Computerworld) Six Worst Internet Routing Attacks

(GO San Angelo.com) US Air Force planning to train hundreds yearly in cyber warfare skills

(Information Week) Thief Steals Sony Ericsson Prototypes

The Windows 7 Beta Team has removed the 2.5 million download limit as stated in the Windows 7 Blog. People can get the Beta until January 24.

Secunia Advisories


Tips:

(Computerworld) How to Secure your Vista PC in 10 easy steps

(Computerworld Blog) Removing malware from an infected PC

The Windows Security Blog has announced a new Beta called Sundance that could help secure Windows and Office 2007 installations.

In relation to what I wrote about around a month ago regarding wireless networks, the crack in the WPA protocol only affects the TKIP version and not AES, so the solution is to simply switch from TKIP to AES as is detailed in this article from Search Security.com, “Cracks in WPA? How to continue protecting Wi-Fi networks“.

(PC Magazine) The Top Tech Tips of 2008 Part 1

(PC Magazine) The Top Tech Tips of 2008 Part 2

Posted in ISMS, News, social engineering, Windows | Tagged: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »